Posted by: Erin | November 9, 2008

Pumpkin Ravioli

I finally had a chance to make the oft-mentioned pumpkin ravioli tonight. I found the recipe on Delish.com a few weeks back when they had a feature on pumpkin recipes on the MSN homepage. (Side note: Delish.com allows you to change the number of servings for a recipe. LOVE it. Just wish it applied to the quantities in the actual steps, not just the ingredient list. But still – super useful.)

Sugar pumpkin with fresh sage

Sugar pumpkin with fresh sage

In preparation for this recipe, I bought a cute little sugar pumpkin at the Copley Farmers Market. However, I got lazy (and a little nervous about putting a metal colander in my oven), so I ended up using a can of solid-pack pumpkin (found for 99¢ a can at Whole Foods).

Canned pumpkin and the sugar pumpkin

Canned pumpkin and the sugar pumpkin

I also had a chance to break out my pretty new 8″ sauté pan. I’ve never cooked with a shallot before, and it somehow escaped me that it is onion-like. My eyes totally started tearing up as I was chopping. I think I remember reading that if you put an onion in the freezer before you chop it up, it helps. I’ve still got half the shallot left, so maybe I’ll try that next time.

Minced shallot and garlic cooking

Minced shallot and garlic cooking

I think I overcooked the shallot and garlic a little bit – the garlic was browner than it probably should have been. It was my first time using this pan, so I wasn’t sure how it handled heat. It’s also thinner than my deceased small frying pan, so I probably had the heat a little too high. Don’t think I ruined it, it just looked browner than I thought it was supposed to be after 4 minutes. (Yes, I stirred all of it while it was cooking.)

Melting parsley and sage cubes

Melting parsley and sage cubes

The recipe calls for fresh parsley and sage. I bought a nice bunch of parsley a little while ago, though I can’t remember why (pumpkin seed pesto, maybe?), and I chopped up the leftovers and froze it in ice cubes. I also bought fresh sage a few weeks ago, and used it to make sage walnut pesto (post on that later). The rest of that got frozen as well. So today was my first experiment with unfreezing frozen herbs. After putting the cubes on paper towels, I stuck them in the microwave for about 30 seconds to start the melting. I left them out while I cooked the garlic and shallots and mixed together the rest of the pumpkin filling.

Pumpkin ravioli filling

Pumpkin ravioli filling

The filling consists of the pumpkin, shredded Parmesan, mascarpone cheese, and the herbs. Of course, I got all the pumpkin filling mixed together before I realized I still had sage and parsley thawing on a plate. I kept looking at the filling, thinking “now where does the sage go?” because I thought the next stage was filling the ravioli. After double-checking, I figured out, yes, in fact, I should have mixed in the herbs. Fortunately, I hadn’t started making the ravioli yet, so it was all good.

Filling the ravioli, stage 1

Filling the ravioli, stage 1

The recipe says to put roughly 1 tablespoon of filling on a wonton skin, then brush the edges with egg white, place another skin on top, and score the edges with a fork.

My first ravioli!

My first ravioli!

I had some issues with the filling – 1 tablespoon seemed like too much, as it kept trying to escape the edges of the ravioli. The ravioli were also rather huge, so I switched to putting less filling in, and only using one wonton skin, folding it in half.

Ravioli!

Ravioli!

After much brushing of egg whites and scoring of edges, the ravioli were done, and it was time to cook them.

Ravioli cooking

Ravioli cooking

What I did not expect in cooking the ravioli was that they practically doubled in size. The double-skinned ones took up nearly a whole salad plate. The folded-over ones were a little more manageable. They’re also super delicate. I only lost the filling out of one of them, which I was fairly impressed with. I think next time, I should probably used a bigger pot, because it was very hard to see the ravioli in order to try and get them out when they finished cooking. Either that, or maybe I just need to make them smaller, I’m not sure. A few clumped together a little, which was frustrating, because it was very hard to separate them (that’s how I lost the filling on the one that broke).

Dinner!

Dinner!

There was no sauce listed in this recipe, but instead, calls for it to be garnished with more shredded Parmesan and minced parsley. (I’m not a huge fan of parsley, so I didn’t bother with it.) Overall, the ravioli turned out well. It was, oddly enough, sort of bland. I put a full clove of garlic in the filling, instead of the 1/2 clove the recipe called for (don’t look at me like that – I like garlic). I don’t know if it needed more, maybe needed salt… Can’t really figure it out. I decided to make a piece of breaded chicken to eat with the ravioli, and it balanced out the bland taste of the ravioli pretty well.

I also tried a new wine with this dish (I figured my current love, Mike’s Pomegranate Lemonade, wouldn’t go as well). I bought a bottle of Relax Riesling a few months back, and finally opened it. The cork was a mess (not sure what caused that), but the wine itself is very nice. I don’t describe wines very well yet, but I suppose it would qualify as a slightly sweet wine. It was good with the ravioli and chicken, but it’s also good just on it’s own. Definitely going to be back in the wine rack’s rotation soon.

And an hour later, I have finally finished typing this. Both writing and cooking would probably have taken less time if I didn’t have so many pictures. 🙂

Advertisements

Responses

  1. When I’ve done ravioli with wonton skin, I’ve found myself having to freeze the ravioli on plates before I cook it; otherwise, the skins get all weird and they stick together and/or fall apart.

  2. I never thought of that. Wonton skins ARE rather thin. I’ll have to try that next time. I’ve got plenty of wonton skins left, just don’t know what to put in them. 🙂


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: